campdracula5eva:

BEST THING EVER WE DON’T NEED ANY MORE THINGS THIS IS THE BEST THING

campdracula5eva:

BEST THING EVER WE DON’T NEED ANY MORE THINGS THIS IS THE BEST THING

reblogged from intelligentairhead

ibeggedformercytwice:

ibeggedformercytwice:

ibeggedformercytwice:

My medieval servant boy has gone missing. I’ll just use Google to see if I can find him.

image

Oh bother.

I still say this was hilarious fuck you guys

reblogged from evil-bones-mccoy
canidaemon:

e-nomine-lux-ferous:

planetepics:

Half-Albino Peacock

Yesss. 

Actually, this is a piebald peacock, not “half albino”. You can’t be ‘half albino’, that’s not how the mutation works. It affects all tissues in the body.
Now, it could theoretically could be possible if the bird is a chimera, but it’s so much more likely to be piebald… And really, it has dark eyes and shanks. It’s not albino.

canidaemon:

e-nomine-lux-ferous:

planetepics:

Half-Albino Peacock

Yesss. 

Actually, this is a piebald peacock, not “half albino”. You can’t be ‘half albino’, that’s not how the mutation works. It affects all tissues in the body.

Now, it could theoretically could be possible if the bird is a chimera, but it’s so much more likely to be piebald… And really, it has dark eyes and shanks. It’s not albino.

reblogged from foofygoldfish

bubblegloopswamp:

megablaziken:

junkculture:

A World Globe Made Out of Thousands of Individually Painted Matchsticks

part of me appreciates the art and part of me wants to set it on fire

you’re the kind of man that just wants to watch the world burn

reblogged from intelligentairhead
s-c-i-guy:

First Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned From A Man’s Skin
Eighteen years ago, scientists in Scotland took the nuclear DNA from the cell of an adult sheep and put it into another sheep’s egg cell that had been emptied of its own nucleus. The resulting egg was implanted in the womb of a third sheep, and the result was Dolly, the first clone of a mammal.
Dolly’s birth set off a huge outpouring of ethical concern — along with hope that the same techniques, applied to human cells, could be used to treat myriad diseases.
But Dolly’s birth also triggered years of frustration. It’s proved very difficult to do that same sort of DNA transfer into a human egg.
Last year, scientists in Oregon said they’d finally done it, using DNA taken from infants. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology, says that was an important step, but not ideal for medical purposes.
"There are many diseases, whether it’s diabetes, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, that usually increase with age," Lanza says. So ideally scientists would like to be able to extract DNA from the cells of older people — not just cells from infants — to create therapies for adult diseases.
Lanza’s colleagues, including Young Gie Chung at the CHA Stem Cell Institute in Seoul, Korea (with labs in Los Angeles as well), now report success.
Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell, they say they started with nuclear DNA extracted from the skin cells of a middle-age man and injected it into human eggs donated by four women. As with Dolly, the women’s nuclear DNA had been removed from these eggs before the man’s DNA was injected. They repeated the process — this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man.
"What we show for the first time is that you can actually take skin cells, from a middle-aged 35-year-old male, but also from an elderly, 75-year-old male" and use the DNA from those cells in this cloning process, Lanza says.
They injected it into 77 human egg cells, and from all those attempts, managed to create two viable cells that contained DNA from one or the other man. Each of those two cells is able to divide indefinitely, “so from a small vial of those cells we could grow up as many cells as we would ever want,” Lanza says.
They look like the cells in a human embryo — in fact, they’re called embryonic stem cells. And with a bit of coaxing, these cells could, theoretically, be prodded to turn into any sort of human cell — nerve, heart, liver and pancreas, for example. That’s what makes them potentially useful for treating all sorts of diseases.
In the 18 years since researchers cloned a sheep, scientists have found another way to produce cloned human cell lines. And the other technique, which produces “induced pluripotent stem cells,” skips the step that requires a human egg cell, so some people find it less fraught, ethically.
It also means that finally getting the sheep technology to work with cells from adult humans may not turn out to be a turning point for this technology, after all.
"We now have two ways and we’re not sure which of the two methods is likely to work best," Lanza says.
Ideally he would like to screen millions of adults and choose just a hundred or so whose genes would make them good DNA donors. He’d like to see a library of cells created with those carefully chosen genes.
In principle, scientists could produce a series of cell lines that would allow a close match for the majority of would-be cell recipients — just as transplant surgeons currently seek a close match for organ donors.
Physicians could also extract DNA from the person who is going to receive the cellular transplant — creating a patient-specific treatment — though that would end up being far more expensive than drawing from a library of ready-made cells.
Paul Knoepfler at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine is excited about this advance from a medical point of view. But he says this does mean we could be getting closer to being able to go beyond cloned cell lines to cloning an entire human being.
"I don’t think that’s coming anytime soon, but certainly this kind of technology could be abused by some kind of rogue scientist," Knoepfler says.
And while many people consider that idea dangerous and repugnant, it is not broadly illegal.
source

s-c-i-guy:

First Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned From A Man’s Skin

Eighteen years ago, scientists in Scotland took the nuclear DNA from the cell of an adult sheep and put it into another sheep’s egg cell that had been emptied of its own nucleus. The resulting egg was implanted in the womb of a third sheep, and the result was Dolly, the first clone of a mammal.

Dolly’s birth set off a huge outpouring of ethical concern — along with hope that the same techniques, applied to human cells, could be used to treat myriad diseases.

But Dolly’s birth also triggered years of frustration. It’s proved very difficult to do that same sort of DNA transfer into a human egg.

Last year, scientists in Oregon said they’d finally done it, using DNA taken from infants. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology, says that was an important step, but not ideal for medical purposes.

"There are many diseases, whether it’s diabetes, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, that usually increase with age," Lanza says. So ideally scientists would like to be able to extract DNA from the cells of older people — not just cells from infants — to create therapies for adult diseases.

Lanza’s colleagues, including Young Gie Chung at the CHA Stem Cell Institute in Seoul, Korea (with labs in Los Angeles as well), now report success.

Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell, they say they started with nuclear DNA extracted from the skin cells of a middle-age man and injected it into human eggs donated by four women. As with Dolly, the women’s nuclear DNA had been removed from these eggs before the man’s DNA was injected. They repeated the process — this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man.

"What we show for the first time is that you can actually take skin cells, from a middle-aged 35-year-old male, but also from an elderly, 75-year-old male" and use the DNA from those cells in this cloning process, Lanza says.

They injected it into 77 human egg cells, and from all those attempts, managed to create two viable cells that contained DNA from one or the other man. Each of those two cells is able to divide indefinitely, “so from a small vial of those cells we could grow up as many cells as we would ever want,” Lanza says.

They look like the cells in a human embryo — in fact, they’re called embryonic stem cells. And with a bit of coaxing, these cells could, theoretically, be prodded to turn into any sort of human cell — nerve, heart, liver and pancreas, for example. That’s what makes them potentially useful for treating all sorts of diseases.

In the 18 years since researchers cloned a sheep, scientists have found another way to produce cloned human cell lines. And the other technique, which produces “induced pluripotent stem cells,” skips the step that requires a human egg cell, so some people find it less fraught, ethically.

It also means that finally getting the sheep technology to work with cells from adult humans may not turn out to be a turning point for this technology, after all.

"We now have two ways and we’re not sure which of the two methods is likely to work best," Lanza says.

Ideally he would like to screen millions of adults and choose just a hundred or so whose genes would make them good DNA donors. He’d like to see a library of cells created with those carefully chosen genes.

In principle, scientists could produce a series of cell lines that would allow a close match for the majority of would-be cell recipients — just as transplant surgeons currently seek a close match for organ donors.

Physicians could also extract DNA from the person who is going to receive the cellular transplant — creating a patient-specific treatment — though that would end up being far more expensive than drawing from a library of ready-made cells.

Paul Knoepfler at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine is excited about this advance from a medical point of view. But he says this does mean we could be getting closer to being able to go beyond cloned cell lines to cloning an entire human being.

"I don’t think that’s coming anytime soon, but certainly this kind of technology could be abused by some kind of rogue scientist," Knoepfler says.

And while many people consider that idea dangerous and repugnant, it is not broadly illegal.

source

reblogged from frozeninfate
source: NPR 190 notes 4.18.2014 11:39 PM
reblogged from intelligentairhead

dannyqhantom:

Lettuce Bacon Green beans Tomato Ally sandwich 

reblogged from psychopompglompyo

frenchie-fries:

vergess:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!

IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!

Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.

Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.

If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
  • Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
  • Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
  • If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
  • See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.
If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions
PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

Extra note: if you live in Oregon, New Jersey, Michigan or New York and see one of these, call your state’s department of agriculture to report it, and trained professionals will come kill it before it can produce seeds and spread.

Frankly, if you see one in general, probably call your DOA and see if there’s a program in place.

Do not burn it, because the smoke will give you the same reaction.

If for some ungodly reason there isn’t a professional who can handle it for you (and please, please use a professional), the DOA of New York has [this guide] for how to deal with it yourself.

OH MY FUCK I HAVE THESE IN MY BACKYARD.

reblogged from little-smartass
reblogged from whatifiminslytherin

armanarlert:

if u know ur myers briggs personality type please check this out it is literally the coolest thing ever 

reblogged from occasionallyevil
source: lcaname 50,081 notes 4.18.2014 10:55 PM

shikitt:

kingdomzelaybli:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

twerquius:

torribash:

amagi-challenge:

helioture:

Shingeki no Kyojin OP… with a ruler.

this is so much bullshit

oh my god

I am so fucking mad right now. No this shit is not ok

holy shit that dude has figured out how to modify both pitch and timbre on a ruler, he must have been practicing this skill for years

it sounds like K.K. Slider

i give up. this is it. this is the peak of humanity. 

reblogged from vulcan-ology
  • one part of the star trek fandom: *deep and philosophical and creates painfully thought-out tags and graphics and gifs*
  • other part of the star trek fandom: sET PHASERS TO HELLA RAD
source: ohsylar 22,236 notes 4.18.2014 10:31 PM

godsandlittlefishes:

we could try renaming romeo and juliet “mercutio laughing at all these goddamn straight people” and see if anyone notices

reblogged from intelligentairhead

letterstogandalf:

Misha Collin’s “Bullshit” expression may be my favorite thing ever.

reblogged from hellredsky

myampgoesto11:

Beautifully designed traditional Japanese Kanzashi hair ornaments by Sakae

reblogged from windmills-of-my-mind